Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) – Steve Young, PT

“I specialize in reporting how your medical conditions impact your ability to live and work. The exam results are often used for disability and work-injury claims.”

Steve Young, Physical Therapist, Columbus, Georgia.
Functional Capacity Evaluator for over 14 years.

705 17th Street, Suite 402, Columbus, Georgia 31901, Phone: 706-225-2525, Fax: 706-225-7185, syoung@holbrooke.org

physical therapy

A Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) is a comprehensive battery of performance-based tests commonly used to determine the ability for work, activities of daily living, or leisure activities. The need for functional evaluation was identified in the 1980s by workers’ compensation systems that required specific information about worker functional capacities and limitations to expedite the return-to-work process. Historically, return-to-work decisions were based upon diagnoses and prognoses of physicians but did not include objective measurements of worker functional abilities and job match demands. Physical therapists, whose core competencies include functional evaluation, began to develop functional capacity tests for comparison to the physical demands of jobs and occupations. These functional tests initially examined and evaluated the ability of a worker to perform physical job match conditions as described by the US Department of Labor in Selected Characteristics of Occupations as Defined in the Revised Dictionary of Occupational Titles and The Revised Handbook for Analyzing Jobs. Functional examination evaluation, combined with diagnoses and prognoses by physical therapists has emerged as a valid and effective tool to support a safe return to work, activities of daily living or leisure activities after an injury or illness.

The Functional Capacity Evaluation today quantifies safe functional abilities and is a pivotal resource for:

Return-to-work and job-placement decisions
Disability evaluation
Determination of how non-work-related illness and injuries impact work performance
Determination of functioning in a non-occupational setting
Intervention and treatment planning
Case management and case closure


Source: American Physical Therapy Association. Occupational Health Physical Therapy: Evaluating Functional Capacity Guidelines

Schedule an FCE in Columbus, Georgia

Contact Steve Young, PT
705 17th Street, Suite 402
Columbus, Georgia 31901
Phone: 706-225-2525
Fax: 706-225-7185

syoung@holbrooke.org

The Disability Clinic

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Are you facing disability because of a life-changing medical condition or work injury? We specialize in reporting how your medical conditions impact your ability to live and work.

DISABILITY & RESIDUAL FUNCTION

Physical impairments can interfere with your ability to perform activities of daily living and job-related tasks. Your physician will provide medical records but you also need residual functional capacity data (RFC) to answer specific questions about your limits with sitting, standing, walking, lifting, pushing, pulling, climbing, etc.

FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY EVALUATION

A Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) is a comprehensive battery of performance-based tests that is used commonly to determine the ability for work, activities of daily living, or leisure activities.

IMPAIRMENT RATING

An impairment rating is a percentage estimate of the amount of normal use that your injured body parts have lost, which is based on guidelines that have been published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

WHEELCHAIRS, POWER CHAIRS, SCOOTERS

A mobility examination, or wheelchair exam, is required to determine whether a special wheelchair is medically necessary because of your physical limitations.

Hospital Contract Therapy Services

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#speechtherapy #physicaltherapy #occupationaltherapy #hospital #holbrooke #contractmanagement

Hospital Contract Therapy Services

“The Missing Piece.” A group of people with a full set of complementary skills required to complete our mission YOUR MISSION! Hospital Contract Therapy Services. Physical, Occupational, Speech Therapy services. Team Holbrooke. Holbrooke Rehabilitation. (706) 225-7405. Steve Young, CEO – syoung@holbrooke.org

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Therapy Services & Hospice Care

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Credit: Hospice Patients Alliance

Occupational, Physical, and Speech-Language Therapy

The hospice benefit specifically provides occupational therapy services, physical therapy services, and speech-language therapy services for those In Home Hospice Care patients or other patients that would benefit from such therapy. Simply having a terminal illness does not mean that we have to “give up” and lay down in bed and immediately die, as some may erroneously believe. Those patients who make the most of their remaining time usually experience the highest quality of life. Hospice is about improving the quality of life and providing comfort care, even if a “cure” for the disease cannot be made. What benefit would these therapies have for your loved one? Many. First of all, these therapists are highly trained specialists in their field and can determine what interventions can help improve your loved one’s quality of life!

Occupational Therapy

An Occupational Therapist can evaluate the ability of your loved one to accomplish his activities of daily living, to do the normal everyday tasks that are commonly performed, such as bathing, getting dressed, brushing his teeth, and feeding himself, etc. If there are difficulties in performing these types of tasks, the therapist can devise alternative ways of accomplishing these tasks which allow the patient to remain more independent (and less dependent upon others) which can often help tremendously with the patient’s self-esteem and attitude. Sometimes different adaptive or assistive devices are used to help patients accomplish these tasks. The therapist can explain how your loved one can conserve his energy by doing things in an easier manner. Helping your loved one continue to do as much as possible (if he or she wishes to do so) can dramatically improve his quality of life. 

Physical Therapy

The physical therapist can evaluate your loved one’s ability to move around safely in the home or facility in senior assisted living Shrewsbury. The therapist will determine what problems your loved one may be experiencing in getting around: walking (if applicable), in and out of bed, transfer from chair to bed, into the bathroom, to and from a car or wheelchair. The therapist can assess the patient’s level of pain and provide physical therapies which can help to reduce pain. Strengthening exercises may be given if your loved one would benefit from these, and the therapist can evaluate all the equipment or layout of your loved one’s living situation to make it safe and easily accessible.

Speech-Language Therapy

The speech-language therapist is specially trained in helping your loved one who might be experiencing difficulties in swallowing food, speaking or communicating in any way. The therapist can help the patient to better communicate and determine what types of foods or food textures are best. For example, some patients who have difficulty swallowing can safely swallow soft or blended foods or foods cooked in different ways. Making sure that your loved one is able to overcome swallowing problems could help your loved one live longer and would certainly improve his quality of life! If your loved one had difficulty speaking or could no longer speak at all, the therapist can help create alternative ways of communicating. Communication between the family members and the hospice patient is so important at the end of life. Unfinished family “business” (relationship issues) can be resolved and your love can be expressed and shared.

Credit: Hospice Patients Alliance

Ask your Hospice Provider about our therapy services for your loved one. Call us at (706) 225-7405 or email syoung@holbrooke.org for more information.

 

Prework Testing

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What is a Prework Test (PT Test)? 

A Prework Test (PT Test) is a series of tasks designed to assess a worker’s ability to perform physical or other demands of a job for which he/she has been hired. Prework testing should only be administered after the selected candidate has accepted a conditional job offer.

What is the main reason an employer would want to use prework testing in the workplace?

The primary reason is to hire workers who can physically and safely do the required tasks of the job.

Are there other benefits to using prework testing in the workplace?

Yes. Other benefits to the organization include:

  • Demonstration and promotion of fair hiring practices
  • Promotion of safe job assignments and performance throughout the workplace
  • Reduction in frequency and severity of work-related injuries
  • Use of objective job-related information in managing injury and return to work situations
  • Improvement of work efficiency (by placing the right worker in the right job)
  • Increased worker morale through participation in the prework screening process

Prework testing is also helpful in case an employee is injured on the job. The information collected during the prework testing process can be used as a baseline that allows the employer (and medical providers) to review the actual physical demand strength the employee possessed as a new hire. Prework testing results can also be used to assess an injured worker’s physical abilities when returning to work from an injury or illness. Using the same criteria for new hires, the employer can confirm that the returning worker is “fit for duty” after recovery and rehabilitation. Source

Call Holbrooke Rehabilitation at (706) 225-7405 or email syoung@holbrooke.org to get started.

What is a Functional Capacity Evaluation?

physical therapy

Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE) is a comprehensive battery of performance-based tests commonly used to determine the ability for work, activities of daily living, or leisure activities. The need for functional evaluation was identified in the 1980s by workers’ compensation systems that required specific information about worker functional capacities and limitations to expedite the return-to-work process. Historically, return-to-work decisions were based upon diagnoses and prognoses of physicians but did not include objective measurements of worker functional abilities and job match demands. Physical therapists, whose core competencies include functional evaluation, began to develop functional capacity tests for comparison to the physical demands of jobs and occupations. These functional tests initially examined and evaluated the ability of a worker to perform physical job match conditions as described by the US Department of Labor in Selected Characteristics of Occupations as Defined in the Revised Dictionary of Occupational Titles and The Revised Handbook for Analyzing Jobs. Functional examination evaluation, combined with diagnoses and prognoses by physical therapists has emerged as a valid and effective tool to support a safe return to work, activities of daily living or leisure activities after an injury or illness.

The Functional Capacity Evaluation today quantifies safe functional abilities and is a pivotal resource for:

  • Return-to-work and job-placement decisions
  • Disability evaluation
  • Determination of how non-work-related illness and injuries impact work performance
  • Determination of functioning in non-occupational setting
  • Intervention and treatment planning
  • Case management and case closure

Source: American Physical Therapy Association. Occupational Health Physical Therapy: Evaluating Functional Capacity Guidelines.